Succulent plant samples

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You can learn more about the affiliate process here. There are hundreds of varieties of succulents. Many grow outdoors in warm climates, but some thrive as indoor plants, too. Succulents range in size from tabletop to gigantic specimens.

But many of the potentially huge ones can be kept small if planted in pots, says Baldwin. Even better? Because succulents are plants that store water in their leaves, stems and roots, they can go weeks between waterings.

The category also includes cacti, which have spines that may be soft, spiky, conical, curved or barbed. But, interestingly, while all cacti are succulents, not all succulents are cacti, says Baldwin. The most important thing to understand about these plants is how to water succulents.

Try again in a few days, and water only when the soil feels mostly dry. Also, make sure the pot has drainage holes, and dump out any water remaining in the saucer after watering. This cute little plant has textured, spiky leaves and tolerates lower light levels than many other succulents on the list.

It makes a great tabletop plant for small spaces. Aloe Vera. Aloe vera plants have a handsome, textural form. Some have smoother edges than others, while many have a pretty blue-green cast. Bonus: The gel inside can be used to help soothe minor burns; simply snap off a leaf at the base and apply.

Echeveria grows in a pretty rosette shape and comes in shades of green, blue-green, reddish, and tinged with pink. In USDA Hardiness zones 9 and warmer find your zone here , you can grow these outdoors. Otherwise, echeveria make pretty tabletop houseplants.

Jade Plant. Jade plants look like miniature trees with a cute, upright form. They can live for decades with the right care. Snake Plant. The strong, upright form adds architectural interest to any space. Snake plant can live for decades with little care. ZZ Plant.

With glossy, dark green leaves and an upright form, the Zamioculcas zamiifolia, also known as ZZ plant, is an especially attractive indoor plant. String of Pearls. This delightful succulent with tiny beads that look like—you guessed it—a string of pearls is a fun houseplant.

It looks especially good in a hanging pot or trailing over the edges of end tables or bookshelves. There are many different varieties of hoya plants, but the one commonly called porcelain or wax plant Hoya carnosa is a great choice for beginners.

It has thick, waxy vining foliage and sweetly-scented star-shaped flowers, which appear when the plants are two to three years old. This succulent is often called hens and chicks because the mother plant hens!

quickly produces offsets, or baby plants chicks! This rosette-shaped succulent grows in USDA Hardiness Zones 3 to 9.

It resembles echeveria but has pointier leaves and is cold-hardy, whereas echeveria grows outdoors only in warm climates.

There are many different types of this succulent. Some are called baby rubber plants, some are variegated and some are called watermelon plants because of their striped foliage. This petite succulent has pretty yellow, pink, orange or red flowers that last for weeks and weeks. Two favorites: Corn plant is upright and stalky like a tree, while dragon tree has Dr.

Seuss-like grassy leaves that come off of several stems. Moonstone Plant. Ponytail Palm. Strappy leaves emerge from a bulbous base, resembling a messy ponytail! This is a fun plant for growing indoors or outdoors in a warm climate.

Holiday Cactus. These pretty plants can live for decades with the right care! They typically bloom around the holidays and may be labeled as a Christmas or Thanksgiving cactus, though Thanksgiving cactus are much more commonly available. You can tell the difference by looking at the flattened stems: Thanksgiving cactus have sharp, pointy edges, while Christmas cactus have more rounded.

They require the exact same care. Pencil Cactus. This fun and funky cactus has long, pencil-like stems. Rosettes typically resemble big, fleshy-petalled daisies. Colors include green, yellow and garnet.

Leaves of Aeonium 'Sunburst' are striped with yellow or cream. Aeonium 'Zwartkop', another show-stopper, is magenta-black. There exist many hybrids like the Aeonium urbicum hybrid shown here. Some species are shrub-forming; all produce rosettes at the tips of ever-lengthening stems. Frost tender. Want to see more of these fleshy succulents with flowerlike forms?

Go to the Aeonium page. These rosette-shaped succulents are native to the Americas. There are dozens of species of agaves, including many that are small and well suited to growing in pots. Agave victoria-reginae is a favorite; it grows to the size of a soccer ball over time.

With the notable exception of Agave attenuata , most agaves tolerate temperatures into the mids F. And somesuch as Agave parryi 'Truncata'go much lower.

Into plants that look like artichokes? Go to the Agave page. Dramatic flower spikes are hot hues of orange or yellow. The main bloom season is midwinter, but there are aloes of various species in bloom at any time of the year.

Gel-filled, tapered and serrated leaves of many aloes form starfish-like rosettes. Species range from a few inches in diameter to tall trees. Aloe arborescens , a common garden plant throughout Southern California, is an excellent fire-retardant succulent for wildfire-prone areas.

This general category refers to succulentsusually from desert climateswith spines, which are modified leaves that radiate from central points aureoles. Some are columnar, others round or have stems like ping-pong paddles.

Small cacti suitable for pots have a huge following with collectors. Do consider using golden barrels in your succulent garden; they offer an amazing textural enhancement. Many but not all cacti tolerate some frost. Into edgy plants? You're not alone. Find out Why Cactus is Popular. There are two main forms: branching and stacked.

Jade Crassula ovata shown here is quite common. Leaf colors include silvery gray, bright yellow, and variegated cream-and-greensometimes with red margins. Use jades as mounding shrubs and grow stacked crassulas, which are great cascaders, in terraces and hanging baskets.

See more of these super easy succs on the Crassula jade page. Those with tight rosettes tend to form hen-and-chicks clusters. Echeverias that resemble cabbages tend to grow atop ever-lengthening stalks, and ruffled varieties are among the showiest of succulents.

All are ideal for containers and some are suitable for garden beds. This immense category includes many nonsucculent plants; all have in common a milky sap that can be irritating, even toxic. Columnar species such as Euphorbia ingens suggest statuesque cacti. Unlike cacti, which have satiny flowers, those of euphorbias are beadlike.

Droll Euphorbia obesa is a spherical succulent plant with subtle herringbone stripes. Popular and ironically named Euphorbia tirucalli 'Sticks on Fire' is a top choice for succulent gardens used as fire breaks in wildfire-prone areas.

These windowsill succulent plants, which seldom get larger than a softball, thrive indoors and do well in pots. I don't recommend growing them in the garden as they readily sunburn and might be stepped on.

Besides, it's a shame not to enjoy them close-up. Haworthias are easily hybridizeda hobby enjoyed by enthusiasts worldwide. Among them is zebra plant, so named for its snazzy white stripes. Discover how and why haworthias make perfect Succulent Desk Buddies. Not to be confused with a succulent commonly called "ice plant" that's a problem in northern CA, these groundcover succulents have brilliant blooms.

Few sights can compare to a hillside massed with ice-plant flowers. Ice plants need no mowing, require very little maintenance, and once established keep weeds at bay.

Ice plants would make ideal lawn substitutes if they could tolerate foot traffic. But you can grow ice plants on steep, rocky slopes, something not possible with a lawn. See "Spring in My Succulent Garden: Flowers Wow with Bold, Hot Hues.

These succulent plants are prized for their colorful or felted leaves and their flowers. Kalanchoes come in a variety of shapes and sizes. Most common is Kalanchoe blossfeldiana , which is sold in supermarkets; numerous hybrids produce long-lasting blooms in crayon colors.

Surging in popularity is Kalanchoe luciae shown here ; its paddle-like leaves are sometimes wavy, and turn from teal to bright red when grown in full sun. Learn more: Should You Let Your Flapjack Plants Bloom? These trailing succulent plants with stacked and concentric or bean-shaped leaves produce masses of star-shaped blooms in summer.

Plant sedums in rock gardens and use them as fillers for containers and as ground covers. Unlike other genera of succulent plants, most sedums especially smaller ones prefer cool summers and winters and tolerate temperatures well below freezing.

Learn more about these and other succulents that don't freeze in winter at Cold Hardy Succulents for Northern Climates. Like sedums, sempervivums are cold-climate succulent plants; they don't do well outdoors in the heat of a Southwest summer.

Semps resemble echeverias but have thinner, pointed leaves and a more compact, spherical form.

15 Popular Types of Succulents · AGAVE · SNAKE PLANT · ALOE · YUCCA · PRICKLY PEAR CACTUS · JADE PLANT · STONECROP · SEMPERVIVUM (HENS AND CHICKS) 10 Outstanding Succulents · Tree aeonium (Aeonium arboreum and cvs.) · Tree aeonium (Aeonium arboreum and cvs.) · Zebra haworthia (Haworthia attenuata) · Echeveria Photos and care info for a wide range of succulents. Descriptions, plant IDs, top varieties, essential info for growing in gardens and pots

Succulent plant samples - Looking to welcome a new succulent in your home but can't decide what type? Check out this list of different succulent types! 15 Popular Types of Succulents · AGAVE · SNAKE PLANT · ALOE · YUCCA · PRICKLY PEAR CACTUS · JADE PLANT · STONECROP · SEMPERVIVUM (HENS AND CHICKS) 10 Outstanding Succulents · Tree aeonium (Aeonium arboreum and cvs.) · Tree aeonium (Aeonium arboreum and cvs.) · Zebra haworthia (Haworthia attenuata) · Echeveria Photos and care info for a wide range of succulents. Descriptions, plant IDs, top varieties, essential info for growing in gardens and pots

Like some varieties of Sedum , these also do well in colder climates and are not well-suited for hot, southwest summers.

Although they resemble Echeveria , they are more compact and have thinner leaves. Sempervivum are easy to care for and will produce multiple offsets to form a thick mat of foliage.

They also thrive in rock gardens or amongst stones or gravel. Delosperma cooperi shown is a hardy variety of ice plant native to South Africa. These spreading ground covers are drought and heat tolerant, and get their name from several varieties that produce calcium crystals on their leaves that resemble frost.

Species and cultivars come in a multitude of colors and will provide a showy carpet of vibrant blooms throughout the summer. This ground cover only asks for well-drained soil and bright light.

The many varieties, colors, shapes and sizes of Echeveria make it hard to pick a favorite. Most are rosettes and come in colors ranging from pastels to deeper shades of pink, blue, orange, green and even in combinations.

Leaf textures can vary from smooth to bumpy, powdery, or fuzzy. They range in size from inches to nearly a foot in diameter.

They bloom on tall flower stalks and a common favorite is Echeveria elegans shown. This huge genus contains over species including poinsettias , with of those being succulents. The common factor is a milky sap that can be irritating to the skin in some varieties and poisonous in others. Some species closely resemble cactus and store water just as efficiently.

Some will bloom with tiny flowers. They vary greatly in size from inches to trees of 30 feet. The symmetrical rosettes that form at the end of the branch-like stems bear resemblance to other succulents such as Echeveria and Sempervivum.

Flowers will bloom from the center of the rosette in clusters in late winter or spring. Yellow, green, red or variegated white leaves are also seen in Aeonium. They sunburn easily, so should be protected from direct bright light.

They will multiply and tend to establish tight overlapping colonies. Bloom stalks will form and shoot up from the center of the plant, but can be removed if unappealing. Haworthia fasciata shown is a favorite for use in mixed succulent plantings.

Senecio mandraliscae , commonly called blue chalksticks shown , is a groundcover succulent that will form drifts of blue in your landscape. Most types of Senecio will tolerate some frost. There are over species, but only about that are succulents.

These succulent Senecio are drought and heat tolerant. RELATED: Water-Wise Gardening Desert Garden Ideas. Get plant information, gardening solutions, design inspiration and more in our weekly newsletter.

More about the newsletter. Copyright Links and buttons take you to detailed info on growing, using and designing with each. In this free PDF exclusively for subscribers to my "Celebrating the Joy of Succulents" newsletter, you'll learn the 7 best easy-care succulents that thrive in pots and landscapes.

Whether you're new to growing succulents or an experienced succulent "parent", you'll love these 7 beautiful plants. Thanks for subscribing! Please check your email inbox in a few minutes for a welcome email from me and your copy of Debra's 7 Best Succulents. There are numerous varieties of succulents, but these are the most common and those you'll most likely run across.

The photo that accompanies each is one example; other species will likely look different. Many of these types of succulents have photo galleries on this site with numerous examples - and each plant is labeled so you'll know which is which.

Rosettes typically resemble big, fleshy-petalled daisies. Colors include green, yellow and garnet. Leaves of Aeonium 'Sunburst' are striped with yellow or cream. Aeonium 'Zwartkop', another show-stopper, is magenta-black. There exist many hybrids like the Aeonium urbicum hybrid shown here.

Some species are shrub-forming; all produce rosettes at the tips of ever-lengthening stems. Frost tender. Want to see more of these fleshy succulents with flowerlike forms?

Go to the Aeonium page. These rosette-shaped succulents are native to the Americas. There are dozens of species of agaves, including many that are small and well suited to growing in pots.

Agave victoria-reginae is a favorite; it grows to the size of a soccer ball over time. With the notable exception of Agave attenuata , most agaves tolerate temperatures into the mids F. And somesuch as Agave parryi 'Truncata'go much lower. Into plants that look like artichokes? Go to the Agave page.

Dramatic flower spikes are hot hues of orange or yellow. The main bloom season is midwinter, but there are aloes of various species in bloom at any time of the year.

Gel-filled, tapered and serrated leaves of many aloes form starfish-like rosettes. Species range from a few inches in diameter to tall trees. Aloe arborescens , a common garden plant throughout Southern California, is an excellent fire-retardant succulent for wildfire-prone areas.

This general category refers to succulentsusually from desert climateswith spines, which are modified leaves that radiate from central points aureoles. Some are columnar, others round or have stems like ping-pong paddles. Small cacti suitable for pots have a huge following with collectors.

Do consider using golden barrels in your succulent garden; they offer an amazing textural enhancement. Many but not all cacti tolerate some frost. Into edgy plants? You're not alone. Find out Why Cactus is Popular. There are two main forms: branching and stacked.

Jade Crassula ovata shown here is quite common. Leaf colors include silvery gray, bright yellow, and variegated cream-and-greensometimes with red margins. Use jades as mounding shrubs and grow stacked crassulas, which are great cascaders, in terraces and hanging baskets.

See more of these super easy succs on the Crassula jade page. Those with tight rosettes tend to form hen-and-chicks clusters.

There are small oval leaves that cluster together on branches and grow upward firmly. Juttadinteria is another snazzy succulent with cactus-like leaves and a beautiful flower that blooms from the center. They have very woody roots, so if you can successfully grow them to be quite large, they may start to look like baby trees.

The boat-shaped leaves cluster together, giving the plant a full appearance without looking bushy. But they do grow very slowly, so have patience! Image Credit: Michael Wolf , CC BY-SA 3. It grows in fat clumps for leaves, so it stores an immense amount of water for the little plant.

They look like small triangular pebbles stuck together, so the plant has a bulky and unusual appearance. But if well cared for in direct sunlight, it can sometimes sprout a pretty yellow flower in the center of the leaves. Lampranthus succulents are gorgeous and rather fascinating. And they can come in a wide array of lovely colors like orange, purple, pink, blue, white, and yellow.

These succulents need lots of sun and warmth and barely any water! The Larryleachia succulent has an odd look. They grow in one big lump and look like a small wrinkly watermelon with small red stars on top.

The red stars are the flower blossoms, which look like thin starfish with a hold in the middle. If you want an exotic and slightly strange succulent to add to your collection, this is a rare find.

The lifesaver plant is one of the weirdest types of succulents, as it has a wide, red ring inside the tubular leaves, making it look a little ominous but still fascinating. Many people that enjoy rare or exotic plants like to add this to their collection.

And it is a resilient plant as long as it avoids frost. But it can even survive with just a few hours of sunlight every day in dry or damp climates. But like most types of succulents, it prefers warm, dry, and sunny spots. The little jewel succulent, sometimes called the jeweled crown, grows in lovely rosettes that are very elegant and simple.

They are typically a mint or pea green with lots of chunky cactus leaves that grow out and up from the roots. The edges can take on a pink hue, and in some cases, the entire plant can become a pinkish-red color for an interesting look.

They grow well in many different hardiness zones, making them easy to care for. Some varieties of this succulent have purple tinges to their leaves , giving them a truly unique look. In nature, they tend to form ground mats of rosettes and can do this in home gardens too. But when grown in pots, they tend not to spread as much.

They are small, dense rosettes with pointed edges that could cut you. The living stone succulent literally looks like a stone , hence the name. These grow super low to the ground in almost perfect spheres, but with a split down the middle, which divides the leaves.

They can be a soft gray, light green, or even a muted copper color. But when you plant several together in one pot or plot of dirt, they often make a fun multi-colored appearance that is very aesthetically pleasing. It almost looks like super fat blades of grass. But Cheiridopsis are low maintenance, so once they start to grow, you can leave them in the sun to thrive and add some green to your home or garden with little effort.

The macho mocha is one of the larger succulents on this list, so if you want a succulent statement this is a great choice. It can also be a dark red if grown under certain conditions.

The monanthes plant is one of the types of succulents with leaves that look like geometric fractals. People love staring at the intricate grooves on the stubby rounded leaves that look too perfect to be natural.

The leaves grow in small clumps, making for a bumpy plant. This succulent also goes by penny-pies or wall pennywort, all of which are pretty funny names. This is one of the more unique succulents, as they cascade down cliff walls and love a damp but shaded environment, but they also appreciate the sun.

The leaves look like lily pads but they have small impressions in the center that make them look like belly buttons! These can be tough to grow and care for if you live in a dry climate, as they thrive in high humidity.

The Opalina plant is a cute little succulent that changes to a deep purple color when it matures. The leaves are sharp tear-drop shapes that start as a mint green color but eventually get pink edges, or in more mature plants, they become a dusty shade of purple.

The leaves are chunky and grow in concentric circles around the thick bud. It stores plenty of water to survive, so it only needs full sun to be happy. The ox tongue succulent has a unique appearance, as the leaves are large and flat with rounded ends that do kind of look like tongues.

Rather than growing in all different directions, they grow in line with one another, creating a sort of fanned look. The leaves are a deep shade of green with light green, yellow, or white spots all over the leaves. Also known as the Shining Bush plant and Man to Man, this peperomia variety does not do well in the cold, and will perish very quickly if the temperature gets too low.

But it loves a damp and steamy environment, so it thrives in warm and humid places. It has chunky succulent stems, but the leaves are thin and shiny, typical of a monstera or similar plant. The leaves are often bi-colored, with white or light green edges or stripes over a dark green color.

This succulent is one of the more stunning plants. They can grow up straight, but often once they approach a foot or taller, the leaves and branches droop down, making them ideal as a lovely hanging plant in your home.

Plover eggs are one of the rarest kinds of succulents, making them sought-after by exotic plant-lovers. This plant is very slow-growing but worth the wait. It starts as small fleshy succulent leaves, but as it grows, it becomes more tree-like, and super mature ones can start to look like chunky bonsai trees.

The leaves take on an array of powdery colors from green to brown to purple. Prenia plants creep along for more than 2 feet. The gray-green leaves range from narrow and elongated to egg-shaped.

Daisy-like flowers blossom from the plant in the summer months in pale pink to white or yellow. They are quite common along roadsides in South Africa.

Plant it in a container to ensure it does not invade the rest of your garden. The Prince Albert Vygie succulent is one of the most adorable and pretty types of succulents. It grows long, slender leaves similar to aloe vera, but a daisy-like flower often blooms in the center of two leaves.

The flowers can be white, purple, or pink and will bring a lovely accent of color to your green garden. Unlike other succulents, this plant does well in both dry and wet climates, as long as it gets enough sun, it will grow well.

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WHAT ARE SUCCULENTS? Over time, their enlarged water-storing Succulent plant samples can develop into an planr form. Semps resemble Succulent plant samples but have thinner, saples leaves and plamt more compact, spherical form. RELATED: Water-Wise Gardening Desert Garden Ideas. This might sound unusual, but this is how these succulents evolved to adapt to extreme living conditions. These plants are great for adding structure and vibrance to gardens and homes. There are two main forms: branching and stacked. The Best Pots for Succulents of Succulent Trees

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